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Join the club: Hampton Downs GT membership

30 March, 2017

 

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If you love track time as much as we do, then a GT Membership should be right up your alley? 

Just over a year ago, Hampton Downs Motorsport Park launched its GT Membership model — a membership designed to sit alongside other exclusive memberships found at the likes of the very best golf and yacht clubs. While such memberships are very common in the northern hemisphere, they have not been tried in this part of the world, Australia included, until now.
Where the motorsport membership model has been successful overseas, the facility has been purpose built, and built to a very high standard. That is also the case at the Hampton Downs and Highlands motorsport parks, which are both owned by Tony Quinn, and where the GT Membership has flourished.

In fact, the Hampton Downs GT members are raving about the club, so we decided it was time to catch up with the Hampton Downs team to find out more about how the membership works, and why it is growing in popularity.

Clearly, the biggest reason is the generous amount of track time included in the deal. GT members get 80 sessions per year, which averages out to more than one day a week — and it doesn’t matter whether you are an amateur or a professional. Think of it like being a member of a golf club. It doesn’t matter how good you are at golf, you still get the same benefits.
However, there are some significant differences that put GT Membership in a league above membership of most golf courses and yacht clubs; quite possibly, above them all. We say that because once you become a GT member, you own it. Yes, that’s right — you own the membership, and after three years you can sell it to the highest bidder if you want.

Given that membership will be closed when it reaches capacity, a positive capital gain from the sale is not out of the question! A small transfer fee is payable when the sale is made, and the only other condition is that Hampton Downs must vet the new member for suitability. You can also pass the membership on through the family. 

Then there is the brand-new members lounge, with the best view of the racetracks from a large balcony and several smaller ones. The lounge belongs to the members exclusively on track days. There are no cash registers in sight — you can help yourself to the fridges packed full of your favourite beverages, and a light lunch and snacks are complimentary.

Driver training is available to members at competitive rates, and sometimes you’ll get some free pointers from members whose names you may recognize — such as Shane van Gisbergen, Greg Murphy, and ‘Mad Mike’ Whiddett! There are three separate track configurations and, outside of major events, members have exclusive access to these. Members are also the only drivers to get a run on the new 4km International Circuit.

With Tony Quinn owning both Hampton Downs and Highlands Motorsport Park, he’s ensured that members of each get to enjoy both facilities, adding five full days on the track at the other venue to membership of each. To help members take up this opportunity, a deal has been done that gives them reduced vehicle transport costs between the two tracks — or, if you prefer, there’s always the option of a hire car, available at each venue. Pit garages are open for free use during any of the 80 sessions.

The more we spoke to the team at Hampton Downs, the more appealing the membership sounded; access to discounted accommodation in Queenstown was the next thing they mentioned, along with 15 guest passes per membership each year, allowing you to take passengers on the track. Of course, immediate family, spouses, and children are welcome to attend any members’ event/day at the track, and that includes access to the members lounge.
When you consider all the above, the $10,000 joining fee and an annual ‘green fee’ of $4500 (both excluding GST) represent excellent value, particularly when you break it down to the track time included: it works out at less than $57 a session — try getting track time anywhere else for that. The value has been well recognized already, with more than 135 members having joined at Hampton; that number is projected to double or even triple by the end of 2017. 

If you’re keen on finding out more, or signing up, give Hampton’s business development manager, Cherie Brown, a call on 027 536 7870, or email [email protected].

Motorsport Flashback – Kiwi rallying in the 1970s

Rallying arrived in New Zealand in 1973 like a tsunami. It had been only a few years since the sport was introduced here and shortly afterwards Heatway came on board as the sponsor to take rallying to a new level. The 1973 Heatway would be the longest and biggest yet, running in both islands with 120 drivers over eight days and covering some 5400 kilometres. The winner was 31-year-old Hannu Mikkola — a genuine Flying Finn who had been rallying since 1963 before putting any thoughts of a career on hold until he completed an economics degree. The likeable Finn became an instant hero to many attracted to this new motor sport thing. I was one of them.

Think of it as a four-door Cooper

New Zealand Mini Owners Club coordinator Josh Kelly of Dunedin loves his Minis. It’s a family affair. Julie and Mike, Josh’s mum and dad, are just as keen, and they can usually all be found taking part in the club’s annual ‘Goodbye, Pork Pie’ charity run from the North of the country to the South.
But lately Josh’s young head has been turned by some other revolutionary BMC cars. He has picked up a couple of Austin and Morris 1100 and 1300s, which he started to restore — that was until an opportunity arose to buy a rare example stored in a shed.